City Boys Can Fish Too

entry1_pic

Now, I don’t consider myself a city boy, but I have talked to a lot of people who most likely never walked barefoot in the woods or on a dirt driveway. Regardless of where we came from, we still share the same love for those fat girls hiding in the water. There is quite a few of us that just don’t have the time or money to drive several hours to fish a river surrounded by trees, or a small lake that wasn’t dug out by their local county 20 years ago, and it really feels like we are missing out on a lot in the bass fishing community.

To anglers like us, the sounds of screaming kids, busy roads and the sight of cookie cutter houses is all too familiar. Like myself, none of these guys let this get in the way of doing what they love. I don’t leave home without one of my poles and a little bit of tackle in my truck. Because you never know when you’re going to drive by a water crossing or a neighborhood pond you’ve never seen before that’s a little too tempting to pass up.

I can’t tell you the amount of gas I have wasted, driving around Houston looking for a new spot to fish. Driving down side streets, scrolling through Google maps, looking for a new honey hole that just might be holding that monster bass with my name on it. Unfortunately, even if, and when you do find a great spot, there is still a pretty good chance you’ll be kicked out (well get into that topic in a later blog!).

There are so many great fishing spots out there, but it is up to you to find them. I understand if you are new to an area, and you ask around where all the good ponds are, but you can’t expect an angler to tell you his favorite place. There are so many ponds and parks that are overrun with anglers that think it is always ok to keep the bass they catch, and in these public areas, that never a good thing.

I once witnessed a guy leaving a pond with a stringer full of bass during SPAWN season! Who would do that? But on a lighter note, fishing in the city has just as many ups as it has downs, don’t get discouraged, meet new people, learn as much as you can. You never know, you might meet a guy who’s got a waterfront vacation home that needs some work, or a bigwig from a lure company, or even your new beer buddy. The fact is, don’t let your geographical location keep you from doing what you love. When life gives you lemons….well you know the rest. 

Please follow and like us:
Posted in: Featured, Pro Staff Blog
UrbanAngler

About the Author:

I am a 27 year old Marine Veteran, and I have recently found my way back home to Texas. Born and raised in the Texas hill country, I grew up with the sounds of cicadas, the smell of pine and cedar and a view of rolling green hills as far as the eye can see. My favorite memory of all is the sound of the Guadalupe River flowing by as its icy cold water rushes over my feet. Growing up, fishing was all I really cared for. My tackle box was filled with nothing more than a few hooks, bobbers, and maybe a couple spinner baits. As I grew up, this dream I was living started to fade away. I got older and took on responsibilities, a wife, two children…bills. After the military, I tried to make my way back into the hill country, but I had to go where the work was. Today I reside near Sugarland, Tx, just 15 minutes south of Houston. It’s a beautiful area, but the only thing missing is, well, natural beauty. My love for bass fishing was almost no more after realizing there were no natural streams or ponds within a reasonable driving distance. I decided to make the best of what I was given. Neighborhood ponds, parks, water run-offs on the side of the road are what I have today. Fishing next to “Resident only signs” and even a few “No Fishing” signs, and getting kicked out of neighborhoods is now something that is all too familiar for me. But of course, that won’t stop me from doing what I love, because I’ll always just come back. Find me on Twitter @UrbanAnglers !

RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Google+
http://militaryhuntingandfishing.com/city-boys-can-fish-too">
SHARE
Pinterest
Pinterest
LinkedIn